Category

Workshop

ELISA Project Launches Call for Papers for November 8-10 Workshop

By Announcement, Blog, Workshop

Since launching in 2019, the ELISA Project has continued to grow in membership, community contributions and working groups. The project’s more than 20 member companies, which include ADIT, AISIN AW CO., arm, Automotive Grade Linux, BMW Car IT GmbH, Codethink, Elektrobit, Horizon Robotics, Huawei Technologies, Intel, Kuka, Linuxtronix, Mentor, NVIDIA, OTH Regensburg, Red Hat, Suzuki, Toyota and Wind River, collaborate to define and maintain a standardized set of processes and tools that can be integrated into Linux-based, safety-critical systems seeking safety certification.

Today, the ELISA Project is excited to announce that its next technical workshop will take place virtually on November 8-10. The event is free and open to developers, users and contributors of ELISA from around the globe looking to learn, network and collaborate. 

The Call for Papers is now open and accepting submissions that will tackle technical strategies for development and deployment as well as real-world applications and use cases. Submit a speaking proposal by Friday, October 1 here: https://events.linuxfoundation.org/elisa-workshop/program/cfp/

The last workshop took place in May with 239 participants from 37 different countries. It featured sessions that showcased working group milestones, open discussions about projects and use cases in automotive and medical. Additionally, this workshop involved more collaboration with adjacent communities, such as Xen, Real Time Linux and AUTOSAR. For a complete recap of the workshop, click here

The ELISA Workshops are hosted once a quarter and are focused on education and outreach for new community members, the exchange of ideas and feedback from the linux kernel and safety communities, as well as productive collaboration to make tangible progress toward achieving the mission and goals of the ELISA Project.

Registration for the event is also open. You can register here

Linux in Basic Safety Applications

By Blog, Workshop

In May, the ELISA Project hosted its 7th Workshop with 239 participants from 37 different countries. For a complete recap of the workshop, click here. Today, we’ll take a look at one of the sessions led by Jason Smith, Principal Engineer at UL LLC, about the “Linux in Basic Safety Applications.”

Linux is more often being used in applications with safety relevance:

  • Complex safety-related functions necessitating the advantages of an OS, or
  • Complex end application necessitating the advantages of an OS, now being asked to perform one or more basic safety-related functions (for example: voltage, current, temperature monitoring)

In both cases, software used to implement the safety-related functions may be required to conform/comply with applicable functional safety standards.

In this presentation, Jason will discuss linux in basic safety applications, the goals and progress of the white paper the ELISA Project is working on and details about how to get involved.

Click here learn more about the ELISA Project, here for the Working Groups and here to join our mailing list. 

Open Source Software Safety Concept Tooling in Freeplane

By Blog, Workshop

In May, the ELISA Project hosted its 7th Workshop with 239 participants from 37 different countries. For a complete recap of the workshop, click here. Today, we’ll take a look at one of the sessions led by Jochen Kall, Expert Engineer Safety at ITK Engineering on behalf of Toyota about the “Open Source Software Safety Concept Tooling in Freeplane.”

The Automotive Working Group uses an open source software mindmap based tooling for developing and documenting Safety Concepts as well as managing the requirements therein. In this session, an introduction to the tool, its capabilities, and use cases is given, followed by a setup/tutorial session guiding the audience through installation and setup of the tool as well as a demonstration of how it can be used in safety engineering.

Freeplane is available on github ((https://github.com/Jochen-Kall/Safety_concept_tool) and helps Safety/Requirements Engineering tasks with support for:
– Avoiding duplication of repeated requirements, leveraging clones
– Managing artifact types, ASILs ,etc and their respective constraints
– Allocating to architectural elements
– Code tagging
– Safety Consistency checking
– Tainting/Changing Propagation in the tree
– Exporting / Importing [WIP]

Watch the video below and let us know if you have questions!

Click here learn more about the ELISA Project, here for the Working Groups and here to join our mailing list. 

Usability of ISO 26262 2nd Edition for an Open Source Design

By Blog, Workshop

In May, the ELISA Project hosted its 7th Workshop with 239 participants from 37 different countries. For a complete recap of the workshop, click here. Today, we’ll take a look at one of the sessions led by Roberto Paccapeli, Functional Safety Manager at Intel and Vito Magnanimo, Functional Safety Architect at BMW Group, about the “Usability of ISO 26262 2nd Edition for an Open Source Design.”

In the automotive domain, the reference standard for Functional Safety is ISO 26262. The normative does not currently provide a clear distinction between new Software design and pre-existing ones. This limitation directly impacts on open source designs, developed in accordance with non-standardized development process (e.g. Linux operations system). This video presents some of the gaps observed in the standard and introduces hints that can be jointly addressed with ELISA members without losing the cornerstone of the ISO (or in contrast with its clauses).

Click here learn more about the ELISA Project, here for the Working Groups and here to join our mailing list. 

Updates for ELISA’s Tooling Investigation and Code Improvement WorkGroup

By Blog, Workshop

The ELISA Project has several working groups each dedicated to a focus or use case. In today’s blog, we’ll take a look at the Tool Investigation and Code Improvement WorkGroup. The Tool Investigation and Code Improvement WG focuses on application of tools, handling the tool results, and improving the kernel based on the tools’ feedback.

Lukas Bulwhan, Safety Software Key Expert at Elektrobit GmbH, leads the Tool Investigation and Code Improvement WorkGroup and recently gave an update about their mission, achievements and roadmap at the last ELISA Project Workshop. You can watch the presentation below.

ELISA Project Workshop May 2021: Tooling Investigation and Code Improvement Working Group Update

If you have questions or would like to join the Working Group, they meet weekly on Tuesdays. Subscribe to the mail list here: https://lists.elisa.tech/g/tool-investigation.

Xen Project: How we do functional safety

By Blog, Workshop

In May, the ELISA Project hosted its 7th Workshop with 239 participants from 37 different countries. For a complete recap of the workshop, click here. Today, we’ll take a look at one of the sessions led by Artem Mygaiev, Director of Technology Solutions at EPAM Systems, Stefano Stabellini, Principal Engineer at Xilinx, about the Xen Project.

Tailored versions of Xen Hypervisor are used in mission-critical systems for years, but this was never the case for Xen’s mainline. Starting 2019, Special Interest Group in Xen Project works on identifying and eliminating obstacles on the way to safety-certify Xen. In this video, Artem and Stefano will talk about their approach, progress so far and collaboration with other groups within Linux Foundation.

Click here learn more about the ELISA Project, here for the Working Groups and here to join our mailing list. 

The Safety Architecture Working Group: Achievements & Plans

By Blog, Workshop

The ELISA Project has several working groups each dedicated to a focus or use case. In today’s blog, we’ll take a look at the Safety Architecture Working Group, which aim’s to determine critical Linux subsystems and components in supporting safety functions, define associated safety requirements and scalable architectural assumptions, deliver corresponding safety analyses for their individual qualification and their integration into the safety critical system.

Gabriele Paoloni, Governing Board Chair for the ELISA Project, leads the Safety Architecture Working Group and recently gave an update about their mission, achievements and roadmap at the last ELISA Project Workshop. You can watch the presentation below.

ELISA Project Workshop May 2021: Safety Architecture Working Group Update

If you have questions or would like to join the Safety Architecture Working Group, they meet weekly on Tuesdays from 8-9 am ET (2-3 pm CET). Subscribe to the mail list here: https://lists.elisa.tech/g/safety-architecture.

A Recap of the 7th ELISA Workshop

By Blog, Workshop

Written by Gabriele Paoloni, Chair of the ELISA Project Governing Board and Lead Software Architect at Intel, and Paul Albertella, Contributor and Member of the ELISA Project and Consultant at Codethink

The latest ELISA workshop, hosted virtually on May 18-20, was a great reflection of how fast the community has grown and evolved over the last few months. Participation was almost double the previous workshop in February with 239 participants from 37 different countries. Additionally, we’ve seen more collaboration with other groups such as AUTOSAR and AGL. The existing working groups have been exploring an extensive range of topics and initiatives, and there are plans to add new working groups to help take some of these forward.

A number of presentations focused on the challenges of qualifying or certifying Linux for functional safety, and the limitations of the established routes presented in standards such as IEC62304, IEC61508 and ISO 26262, and innovative approaches to addressing these. One proposed strategy included a more comprehensive look at a Linux Architectural design, and using test and tracing techniques to verify system behaviour against a derived model. Another proposal, focused on top-down hazard analysis to define safety requirements, statistical analysis of tests on historical kernel versions to show where Linux satisfies these, and fault injection techniques to validate the safety mechanisms of the wider system.

There were also talks on how some of these ideas are being applied in the working groups, focussing on collaborative efforts in the Automotive, Safety Architecture and Development Process groups based on the Telltale use case. Other interesting sessions focused on technologies with possible applications for functional safety, including an introduction to real time configurations for Linux, and the use of authorisation hooking in security modules. 

Discussions during these sessions made it clear that the community has a lot of new ideas to explore over the coming months and a lot of new participants eager to get involved. Work continues on the ELISA technical strategy, which will provide an important direction to this work, but there’s also a need to consolidate the innovative ideas and methodologies for qualifying Linux into the current working group activities, and evaluate the need for new working groups. As ELISA becomes more mature we need to define and refine the publication strategy for the outputs of working groups. There are also plans to develop ‘onboarding’ material for the project to help enable new participants to start contributing more quickly.

You can view the some of the presentation materials here when you click on each session. Some of the videos will be accessible too in the next few weeks.  

Tuesday, May 18

Shuah Khan, the Chair of the ELISA Project Technical Steering Committee, kicked off the workshop with an overview of the project, the working group activities and the recent whitepaper summarizing their interactions and deliverables.

As the different working group updates were presented, it became clear that there is a great deal of collaboration between each group:

  • The Automotive WG refined the safety concept following feedback from the Safety Architecture WG and is working with the Tools Subgroup to optimize the active Kernel image footprint;
  • The Safety Architecture WG is working with the Development Process WG on safety analyses and on a new hybrid qualification approach;
  • The Medical Device WG is coming to a point where they need to hand over the safety requirements to the Safety Architecture WG for deeper Kernel analyses; 
  • The Tools WG released a static code analysis framework that can be used along the qualification activities of the different WGs.

Additionally, Artem Mygaiev and Stefano Stabellini gave an introduction and update about the Functional Safety Special Interest Group (SIG) in the Xen project. This session was engaging as we shared feedback and ideas about functional safety from different perspectives. 

Wednesday, May 19

Philipp Ahmann introduced the engagement between the Automotive WG and the Autosar Adaptive consortium. We have many common interests and goals that should easily help us build a solid foundation for future collaboration. 

Then Roberto Paccapeli and Vito Magnanimo presented the current limitation of ISO26262 in qualifying a complex pre-existing SW component, like Linux, and the need for overcoming such limitations.


Gabriele Paoloni and Daniel Bristot de Oliveira presented an innovative approach (Hybrid Approach) that could be used as a scalable way to qualify Linux to be used in automotive safety critical applications; hence a proposal to overcome the above mentioned limitations.

Elana Copperman and Gabriele Paoloni presented the out of context analysis of the Linux Watchdog subsystem as a practical example of applying the Hybrid Approach, and how this is beneficial in the context of the Automotive WG’s Telltale use case.

Finally, Thomas Gleixner introduced the Linux Real-Time project, the challenges that they faced to meet timing constraints and all the different solutions they put in place to overcome them. It was a really nice tour of the project with lots of possible intercepts with functional safety systems.

Thursday, May 20

On the last day, Shuah Khan and Elana Copperman presented the work done to analyze Kernel configuration parameters (Kconfig) and their impact on Functional Safety, starting from some similar work done for Security (CWE).

Chris Temple then presented an overview of the possible SW qualification routes in

Functional Safety ranging from ISO26262 to IEC61508 reinforcing the current limitations of safety standards with respect to the qualification of complex SW components already discussed in the previous day.

Following this, Paul Sherwood and Paul Albertella presented yet another approach to overcome such limitations: an in-context approach based on a mix of safety analysis, testing of historical kernel versions and fault injection. This approach sparked a lot of interest and a need to further consider and discuss it across the different ELISA WGs was widely agreed.

STPA diagram from New Approach presentation

The final day closed with some wrap-up sessions discussing future activities to advertise ELISA and encourage new members to join, ELISA goals for the next quarter and a few stats about the current workshop. 

It was wonderful to get together virtually as a community. With more than 200 participants, we hope that attendees were engaged in our work and welcome their thoughts and participating in any of our technical meetings and working groups. Click here learn more about the ELISA Project, here for the Working Groups and here to join our mailing list. 

The ELISA Workshop: Functional Safety at Xen Project

By Blog, Workshop

Written by George Dunlap, Xen Project Advisory Board Chair

Tailored versions of Xen Hypervisor have been used in mission-critical systems for years, but this was never the case for Xen’s mainline. Starting 2019, a Xen Project Functional Safety Special Interest Group was formed to identify and eliminate obstacles to safety-certify Xen.

Safety certification is one of the essential requirements for software to be used in highly regulated industries. Besides technical and compliance issues (such as ISO 26262 vs IEC 61508) transitioning an existing project to become more easily safety certifiable requires significant changes to development practices within an open source project.

At the upcoming ELISA Workshop on May 18-20, Artem Mygaiev, Director, Technology Solutions, EPAM Systems and Stefano Stabellini, Principal Engineer, Xilinx, will lay out some challenges of making safety certification achievable in open source.  The talk, scheduled for May 18 at 7:30 am PDT, will primarily focus on the necessary processes, tooling changes, and community challenges that can prevent progress. Additionally, the talk will offer an in-depth review of how Xen Project is approaching this challenging goal and try to derive lessons for other projects and contributors.

This talk will provide real-life perspectives from open source community members on achieving safety certification. Audiences will have a clear understanding of what obstacles the group faced and how they are overcoming challenges, as well as how to set realistic expectations when embarking on this task. Add this talk to your schedule here: https://sched.co/j3SO.

The ELISA Workshop is free and open to the public. Check out the schedule and register today: https://events.linuxfoundation.org/elisa-workshop/.

ELISA Workshop #6 Virtual February 2-4, 2021

By Blog, Workshop

The ELISA Workshop #6 will be held over 3 days, February 2-4, 2021.

Once again the ELISA technical community will gather virtually to continue advancing on topics and work relevant to functional safety and safe linux applications. The ELISA Workshop series are focused on education and outreach for new community members, exchanges of ideas and feedback from the linux kernel and safety communities, as well as productive collaboration to make tangible progress toward achieving the mission and goals of the ELISA Project.

Registration

Workshop registration is now closed.

All workshop attendees must register in order to receive session joining details.

Please contact workshop@elisa.tech for late registration requests or any other workshop related questions.

Session Schedule (UTC)

Day 1: Tuesday, February 2, 2021

12:00 – 12:30 Welcome and ELISA Strategy (Shuah Khan, Kate Stewart)

12:30 – 13:00 Summary of Safety Architecture WG Activities (Gab Paoloni)

13:00 – 13:30 Summary of Automotive WG Activities (Jochen Kall)

13:30 – 14:00 Summary of Development WG Activities (Elana Copperman)

14:00 – 14:30 Introduction of Tool Investigation and Code Improvement Subgroup (Lukas Bulwahn)

14:30 – 15:00 Summary of Medical Devices WG (Kate Stewart)

15:00 – 16:00 Effective Use of MISRA Checkers (Gabriele Paoloni, Eli Gurvitz, Roberto Paccapeli, Maurizio Iacaruso)

16:00 – 17:00 Testing Strategy for Safety Qualification and FFI Evidences (Gabriele Paoloni, Eli Gurvitz)

Day 2: Wednesday, February 3, 2021

10:30 – 11:30 Cybersecurity Expectations in the Automotive World (Andreas Gasch)

11:30 – 12:30 Code Coverage Analysis for GLibC (Eli Gurvitz, Ashutosh Pandey)

12:30 – 13:30 Intel’s Linux Test Robot (Eli Gurvitz, Oliver Sang, Philip Li)

13:30 – 14:00 Linux in Basic Safety Application White Paper Update (Jason Smith)

14:00 – 15:00 Manage ELISA Documenation in GitHub (Paul Albertella, Pete Brink, Jochen Kall, John MacGregor, Jason Smith)

15:00 – 15:30 Updates on Measuring Code Review in Linux Kernel (Basak Erdamar, Lukas Bulwahn)

15:30 – 16:00 Lightening Talks (Lukas Bulwahn)

16:00 – 18:00 Kernel Configuration for Safety Critical Applications (Shuah Khan, Elana Copperman)

Day 3: Thursday, February 4, 2021

12:00 – 12:30 To Whom It May Concern, Please Integrate My Patch (Pia Eichinger, Lukas Bulwahn, Ralf Ramsauer, Wolfgang Mauerer)

12:30 – 13:30 Networking / Social Mixer (those who express interest will be sent a separate meeting invite)

13:30 – 14: 30 Goal Setting for Next Quarter (Shuah Khan)

14:30 – 15:00 Workshop Wrap-up (Shuah Khan, Kate Stewart)

15:00 – 17:00 Kernel Testing Reference Process and Follow-ups for ELISA (Elana Copperman, Kate Stewart, Paul Albertella, Pete Brink)

Questions?

Have questions about the ELISA Workshop? Please contact workshop@elisa.tech.