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Linux in Aerospace: A Personal Journey

By Blog, Working Group

Written by Steven H. VanderLeest, Software Engineering Technical Lead at The Boeing Company and Chair of the ELISA Aerospace Working Group

Introduction

From the early days of Linux, I was a fan of this innovative, open-source Operating System (OS). I appreciated it as a hobbyist, helping me run Linux at home. I appreciated it as an educator, helping my computer engineering students walk with Linux through OS concepts. However, as a professional working in the safety-critical domain of aerospace, I wondered: could Linux fly?

My Pre-flight Taxi with Linux

My journey with Linux had its roots in the 1980s before Linus Torvalds introduced his new OS to the world in 1991. During my undergraduate degree in the 1980s, my engineering program had some labs equipped with the relatively recent IBM Personal Computer (PC). The machines were amazing, but my ability to command their power was somewhat limited by the OS, which was the Microsoft Disk Operating System (MS-DOS). When I reached my third year, I gained access to a Sun Workstation running SunOS, a variant of Unix. I quickly learned to appreciate the rich menagerie of shell commands, the power of combining them with redirection such as pipes, and the aesthetics of the fledgling X-Windows GUI.

I first heard about Linux in graduate school in the early 1990s at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. My doctoral thesis was on Input/Output (I/O) performance, especially on multiprocessor systems. My research analyzed and quantified I/O performance on OSs such as SunOS, SGI IRIX, DEC OSF/1, HP-UX, and Linux. One key finding of my research was that I/O performance could be impacted by the interference caused by unrelated transactions contending for shared resources within a multi-processor system. The magnitude of the impact was heavily dependent not only on the computing hardware architecture but also on the architecture of the OS. Interference could even occur on a uni-processor where independent processes had I/O tasks clustered in time.

As an educator, I applied Linux in my teaching. After finishing my Ph.D., I returned to my alma mater, Calvin College (now University), to take a position as a professor of engineering, teaching computer engineering topics. Linux provided a rich learning environment where my students could look under the hood while learning about operating systems. The transparency of open-source code made an ideal environment for learning and innovation. I also wanted to share my love for working at the interface between computer hardware and software. Studying the Linux kernel provided key insights into how the OS manages the hardware on behalf of applications. The overall system’s performance will improve if the OS is reasonably tuned to take advantage of the hardware architecture.

As a hobbyist, I used Linux at home. I set it up on any extra desktop or laptop I could get my hands on. The whole family got involved when I set up MythTV, an open-source streaming media system, and installed it on a spare Linux desktop system along with an expansion card to capture and record live television. We were asynchronously watching programs and never missing an episode well before any of our friends or neighbors followed suit with ReplayTV or TiVo.

As an engineering professional, I found opportunities to bolster my work with Linux. The challenge was that my employers often required MS Windows as the standard a bureaucratic IT department imposed. Nevertheless, I discovered ways to use Linux by dual-booting or a LiveCD approach and eventually run Linux in a virtual machine using hypervisors like VirtualBox. Like its Unix forebears, Linux was much more stable and reliable than Windows. Even if an application program went astray, I got a segmentation fault warning at most, and the other processes continued. Windows was prone to the Blue Screen of Death, bringing the system to a halt much too often. While it might be distressing to lose your work when this happened, losing a few minutes of labor (or hours if you didn’t save often) was a minor albeit annoying inconvenience. I couldn’t expect higher reliability since that wasn’t a use case for office desktop systems. I quickly realized that Windows doesn’t apply to safety-critical systems.

I also would not expect an operating system designed for an office desktop/laptop to work for embedded systems where the available main memory and secondary storage are limited. Embedded computing platforms are all around us but hidden inside our vehicles, more sophisticated consumer electronics, and smart devices. Windows might not work in these use cases, but Linux could! I started using Linux on embedded development boards when chip manufacturers such as Freescale (later NXP), Intel, Texas Instruments, and others began providing a Linux Board Support Package. The chip makers found this approach was the most effective way to get developers up and running quickly on their new hardware.

Taking Flight with Linux

Within safety-critical domains such as aerospace, Linux provides the foundation for multiple software development environments that run on desktops and laptops. As we move toward distributed development, Linux is a ubiquitous cloud guest OS.

For embedded, safety-critical applications, Linux is less common than a Real-Time Operating System (RTOS). However, a group of Linux developers has been slowly improving real-time performance since the 1990s. Attention coalesced into the PREEMPT-RT patch since 2004, with key parts of the patch making their way to the mainline kernel code. Today, almost all PREEMPT-RT functionality is mainlined but must be enabled through kernel configuration parameters. As for the safety-critical need, in the early 2010s, several research groups examined Linux as a foundation for an Integrated Modular Avionics (IMA) system. I led one of these efforts as the Principal Investigator for a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract with the US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). We developed a proof-of-concept safety-critical system that combined the Xen hypervisor with Linux as a guest OS, to provide ARINC 653 partitioning, a key standard related to IMA.

Over the past decade, multiple private endeavors have applied Linux in aeronautical and astronautical computing systems, even platforms with modest safety criticality, though only a few of these efforts have been publicized. Demonstrating that software is reliable enough for flight is ambitious. I work for Boeing, one of the aerospace companies tackling that challenge. The next section provides an overview of the four key characteristics necessary to put aircraft using Linux into the air.

Developing Software for Aerospace is Challenging

For use in avionics (an electronic computing platform used on an aircraft), the software must be fast, deterministic, embedded, and assured.

Fast

For use in avionics, Linux must be fast. The Linux developer community is already heavily focused on speed, constantly innovating kernel performance improvements.

The aerospace industry can largely leverage the Linux community effort toward high performance. There may be a few specialized devices where drivers must be further optimized. However, those devices will almost always follow the existing design patterns and take advantage of community innovations, such as io_uring. Another example of an area that might need more attention is boot time. For aerospace, certain fault-tolerance techniques require a fast boot-up (or in-air re-boot) time. In these cases, the system must be operational in only a few seconds or even less.

Deterministic

For use in avionics, Linux must be deterministic. Remember the action thriller series 24? Jack Bauer (played by Kiefer Sutherland) would introduce the series with a voice-over claiming “events occur in real-time”. The audience understood that we were watching as if it were airing live. This commonly understood definition of real-time is not quite the same idea as a real-time computing system. For an RTOS, real-time means that the response to critical events will occur within a deterministic amount of time, even in the worst case. Most computing systems- hardware and software- are tuned to optimize the average response time. Most users and actions enjoy a rapid response, but sometimes at the expense of a slow response for certain users or certain actions. A deterministic system is not necessarily fast — it simply means that we can bound, with confidence, the maximum for critical response times. We want a guaranteed maximum response time in a real-time system, even in the worst case. If we were grading responses like students, we don’t care if the best score was an A+ or the average score was a C. We care that the worst score is still a passing grade in real-time systems. Let’s say the system must always respond within 50 milliseconds, or something bad happens. Over a series of tests, perhaps you find that the fastest response is 12 milliseconds, the average is 27 milliseconds, and the worst is 42 milliseconds. For determinism, we only care that the worst response is still under the requirement (in this example, it appears to be meeting our needs).

The aerospace industry can leverage the Linux community’s effort toward determinism. The PREEMPT_RT patches developed over the last 20 years have largely been mainlined, but must still be configured to enable them. Deterministic boot time has received less attention than deterministic response time, but both are important for aerospace applications.

Embedded

For use in avionics, Linux must be embedded. Embedded use cases are constrained with limited size, weight, and power. The most widely deployed embedded instance of Linux is probably the Android OS, used on the largest number of smartphones around the globe today. The vast majority of the billions of embedded devices that make our digital world run smoothly are not this visible — they are under the hood in your car, behind the panel of your home thermostat, and in many other behind-the-scenes locations.

Many industries, including the aerospace industry, continue to turn to Linux for embedded systems. Chip manufacturers continue to support Linux, often the first OS for which they provide starter software development kits. Developers from across the open-source community continue to develop drivers for new devices.

Assured

Regulatory agencies often oversee safety-critical systems to ensure the software is correct to a high confidence level. Because public safety is at stake, the agencies generally have the authority to enforce standards before a product can be released. For use in avionics, Linux must be assured. For avionics software in civilian aircraft, the authority to approve flight certification is specific to a geographic region. For example, in the United States, it is the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA); in most of Europe, it is the European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA).

The details of safety standards vary across industries such as nuclear, automotive, medical, aeronautical, rail, and others. However, the same basic concepts are found in all of them, such as expert peer review or formal means of verification and validation to show the software is suited to purpose. Most have two aspects: ensuring the software is reliable (it does the things we want) and safe (it does not do things we do not want).

A key standard for avionics software is DO-178C, which describes software development life cycle processes and objectives that must be met. DO-178C defines five software levels. The lowest is level E, where a software bug has no impact on the safety of the crew or passengers. An example might be the passenger entertainment system. The highest is level A, where a software bug could have catastrophic results. An example might be the flight control software that responds to pilot commands.

The aerospace industry can leverage much less from the Linux community regarding assurance than the other criteria stated earlier. On the one hand, Linux has been extensively field-tested, so it has a strong product history. Due to the crowd-sourcing nature of open source, Linux likely has more expert peer reviews than any other existing software. Assurance of Linux also benefits from the reasonably large number of tests available within several test frameworks. On the other hand, Linux was not designed expressly for aerospace, nor even for safety-critical use cases in general. The design has been much more iterative and ad-hoc, making it more challenging to demonstrate the correct design to software safety regulatory authorities.

Conclusion

Linux is already being used in flight-certified systems at level D. Aerospace companies like Boeing are now poised to use Linux more broadly and at higher levels of assurance, with groups like ELISA leading the effort. ELISA is the Enabling Linux In Safety Applications project under the Linux Foundation. Its mission is to make it easier for companies to build and certify Linux-based safety-critical applications. ELISA recently formed a new working group focused on Aerospace, which will tackle some of the challenges outlined above. We are just getting this group started and welcome new members!

I have crawled, walked, and run with Linux. Now it is time to fly!

For more information

This article previously ran on Linux.com.

ELISA Summit: Medical Devices Working Group Update (Video)

By Blog, ELISA Summit, Working Group

An estimated 185 people registered for the ELISA Summit, which took place virtually on September 7-8 to gather Linux community members and attendees from around the world. The event, which featured 15 sessions and 20 speakers, was open to anyone involved or interested in defining, using, or learning about common elements, processes, and tools that can be incorporated into Linux-based, safety-critical systems amenable to safety certification. Members of the ELISA Project community presented best practices and overviews on emerging trends and hot topics to using open source software in safety-critical applications and detailed working group updates.

We’ll be featuring event videos in blogs each week. Today, we focus on a session presented by the team members from ELISA Medical Device Working Group: Jason Smith, Jeffrey (Jefro) Osier-Mixon, Kate Stewart, Milan Lakhani,Nicole Pappler, Shefali Sharma, Shuah Khan on the topic of Medical Device Working Group update.

The main goal of this working group is to develop best practices to analyze systems and identify the components of Linux that will be participating in safety analysis, in the context of medical device safety standards. The main activities include 

  • Analysis of open source medical device application (openAPS)
  • Create documentation of results of STPA analysis (system, requirements, architecture, design, …)
  • Comparison of results of STPA analysis to 62304 Software of Unknown Provenance (SOUP)
  • Create documentation on usage of tooling to support kernel analysis 

In this session, the team shares progress to date, as well as some of the lessons learned and areas where they could use some help. The deliverables being worked on for the next quarter will be previewed as well.

Watch the video below or check out the presentation materials here.

For more details about the ELISA Project, visit the main website here. To learn more about the Medical Device Working Group or to join the community, click here.

ELISA Summit: Kernel Tracing (Video)

By Blog, ELISA Summit, Working Group

An estimated 185 people registered for the ELISA Summit, which took place virtually on September 7-8 to gather Linux community members and attendees from around the world. The event, which featured 15 sessions and 20 speakers, was open to anyone involved or interested in defining, using, or learning about common elements, processes, and tools that can be incorporated into Linux-based, safety-critical systems amenable to safety certification. Members of the ELISA Project community presented best practices and overviews on emerging trends and hot topics to using open source software in safety-critical applications and detailed working group updates.

We’ll be featuring event videos in blogs each week. Today, we focus on a session presented by Shefali Sharma, Senior year CSE Student, India and LFX Mentee at ELISA Medical Devices WG on the topic “Kernel Tracing.” In this video, Shefali presents the work she did during her ELISA Mentorship Program including:

  • Understanding system resources necessary to build and run a workload is important.
  • The highlights of theLinux tracing and strace can be used to discover the system resources in use by a workload. 
  • The completeness of the system usage information depends on the completeness of coverage of a workload.
  • Performance and security of the operating system can be analyzed with the help of tools like ftrace, perf, stress-ng, paxtest.
  • Once we discover and understand the workload needs, we can focus on them to avoid regressions and use it to evaluate safety considerations.

In addition to these topics, she also explains about her mentorship experience with ELISA Medical Working Group.  Watch the video below or check out the presentation materials here.

If you’re interested in becoming a ELISA Project or Linux Foundation mentee, you can review mentorships and all here: https://lfx.linuxfoundation.org/tools/mentorship/.

ELISA Summit: Generation of Static Architecture Diagrams for Specific Kernel Images (Video)

By Blog, ELISA Summit, Working Group

An estimated 185 people registered for the ELISA Summit, which took place virtually on September 7-8 to gather Linux community members and attendees from around the world. The event, which featured 15 sessions and 20 speakers, was open to anyone involved or interested in defining, using, or learning about common elements, processes, and tools that can be incorporated into Linux-based, safety-critical systems amenable to safety certification. Members of the ELISA Project community presented best practices and overviews on emerging trends and hot topics to using open source software in safety-critical applications and detailed working group updates.

We’ll be featuring event videos in blogs each week. Today, we focus on a session presented by Alessandro Carminati, Red Hat and Maurizio Papini, Red Hat on the topic Generation of Static Architecture Diagrams for Specific Kernel Images.”

In this talk, the experts shared how they generated a static architecture diagram of the Kernel based on radare2. To analyze the kernel for safety is challenging since it is a huge monolithic piece of code. Subsystems exist within the kernel, but they are not well defined nor documented. ISO26262 part6 requires a ‘Software architectural design specification’ that can be used to support safety analysis and drive the function of tests.

Watch the video below or check out the presentation materials here.

ELISA Summit: Automotive Working Group Update – Tell-tales an Evolution Use Case Towards Driver Assistance ?!(Video)

By Blog, ELISA Summit, Working Group

An estimated 185 people registered for the ELISA Summit, which took place virtually on September 7-8 to gather Linux community members and attendees from around the world. The event, which featured 15 sessions and 20 speakers, was open to anyone involved or interested in defining, using, or learning about common elements, processes, and tools that can be incorporated into Linux-based, safety-critical systems amenable to safety certification. Members of the ELISA Project community presented best practices and overviews on emerging trends and hot topics to using open source software in safety-critical applications and detailed working group updates.

We’ll be featuring event videos in blogs each week. Today we’ll feature the session by Philipp Ahmann, Robert Bosch GmbH supported by work from Paul Albertella, Codethink, and Christopher Temple, Arm on the topic Automotive Working Group Update – Tell tales an evolution use case towards driver assistance.

The session mainly covered the topics such as what is a tell tale and why is it the use case of the Automotive WG? What is STPA and advantages of it. This session gave an update on the latest activities of the Automotive Working Group status. Focus was put on the explanation why the Automotive Working Group has selected the use case of “safe displaying of warning signs on instrument cockpit” also called “telltales”. The benefits of the use case is illustrated as well. The relationship to other use cases is provided and the natural evolution to other automotive use cases like driver assistance features is shown.

Watch the video below or check out the presentation materials here.

To learn more about the Automotive Working Group or to join the mailing list or meetings, click here.

Addressing Space Isolation for Enhanced Safety of the Linux Kernel (Video)

By Blog, Technical Update, Working Group

Written by Igor Stoppa, Senior Software Architect at Nvidia

For more than two decades, Linux has made inroad in new fields of applications, from data centres, to embedded. We see now a growing demand for Linux in safety critical applications, ranging from automotive to robotics, to medical appliances.

However, Linux was not designed with these applications in mind, and unsurprisingly it is not an ideal fit, at the moment.In particular, one major pain point is the very limited resilience to spatial interferences originating from within the kernel itself.

Furthermore, the code base if much larger than what can be found in other operating systems traditionally found in safe applications. This is also compounded by the fact that Linux does not follow the processes traditionally in use for Functional Safety.

Summary

In the video, I describe my ongoing experiment of modifying the Linux kernel, to introduce a form of Address Space Isolation, meant to provide a mechanism enforcing freedom from interference. The presentation describes the problems, possible means to address it, and the current progress with the implementation. You’ll see a methodology for the safety analysis of a Linux system and mechanism for improving the safety of selected components.

This presentation ties both into the scope of the Linux Features for Safety-Critical Systems Working Group and the Critical SW track at Open Source Summit Europe. Though this work is not formally sponsored nor endorsed by ELISA, it is something I shared with the community for brainstorm and discussion purposes.

If you’d like to learn more about the Linux Features for Safety-Critical Systems Working Group or you’d like to continue this conversation, please join the mailing list or a WG meeting here.

Open Source Summit North America (Videos)

By Blog, Industry Conference, Working Group

This year, Open Source Summit North America was held as an umbrella conference, composed of a collection of 14 events covering the most important technologies, topics, and issues affecting open source today in June. There were a total of 2,771 attendees with 1,286 of those attending in person in Austin, from 1,041 organizations across 68 countries around the globe. The event attracted a diversified mix of open source community members from across the ecosystem. 54% of attendees were in technical positions, and developers comprised more than a quarter of attendees. You can read the post-event report here. You can also view all of the event playlists on the Linux Foundation Youtube Channel.

The ELISA Project was featured in several sessions and represented by ambassadors and community members at the conference. If you missed these presentations, you can watch the videos below:

Enabling Linux in Safety Applications (panel discussion)Gabriele Paoloni, Red Hat (ELISA board chair) Kate Stewart, Linux Foundation (ELISA Executive Director) Paul Albertella, CodeThink (Open Source Engineering Process) Elana Copperman, Intel (Linux Features) Philipp Ahmann, Bosch GmbH (Automotive) Milan Lakhani, Codethink (Medical Devices) 

Meeting business and safety objectives while building safety critical applications is a huge challenge for any industry, particularly those who have not had previous experience with open source and Linux. ELISA’s charter is to help industries navigate technical and non-technical challenges in order to bring the benefits of open source to safety applications and help organizations provide the rigor needed for certification. This panel features ELISA working group leads who will share their vision of making Linux a prominent player for FuSa applications in several industries. Join us to learn more about the project and how you can contribute to the community’s overall success.

Finding the Path from Embedded to Edge using Product LinesSteffen Evers, Bosch.IO & Philipp Ahmann, Robert Bosch GmBH

Linux is used for many embedded device classes today. However, it is increasingly desirable to connect these devices with each other and with the cloud. Embedded container technology can be used to make this easier by merging server/cloud and embedded technologies. However, it also leads to more challenges e.g. in respect to security, safety, traceability, and SBOMs. Using Linux across multiple device classes and product lines, and adding cloud technology, causes the complexity and efforts to explode.

In this talk, we describe how Bosch, and others, use embedded containers and “reference systems” to avoid redundant work and get a large number of embedded projects under control.

A reference system is an adjustable compilation of tools along with a pre-configured bundle of packages for a common use case and defined set of devices. This reuse significantly reduces development and maintenance costs, and speeds up the time to market. In this way, reference systems can form the base for your product lines.

Bosch uses the in-house Debian-based embedded distribution “Apertis” as the basis for several reference systems, e.g. for automotive infotainment systems. In doing so we push as many efforts as possible from individual projects into Apertis, as the meta-layer. Thereby, the users can focus more on the actual functionality and applications. e.g. one issue that we have addressed in the context of software management is the handling of GPLv3 in embedded devices. Another topic has been mainline support for kernel drivers.

BOF: SBOMs for Embedded Systems: What’s Working? What’s Not? – Kate Stewart

With the recent focus on improving Cybersecurity in IoT & Embedded, the expectation that a Software Bill of Materials (SBOM) can be produced, is becoming the norm. Having a clear understanding of the software running on an embedded system, especially in safety critical applications,  like medical devices, energy infrastructure, etc. has become essential.  Regulatory authorities have recognized this and are starting to expect it as a condition for engagement.  This BOF will provide an overview of the emerging regulatory landscape, as well as examples of how SBOMs are already being generated today for embedded systems by open source projects such as Zephyr, Yocto and others,  followed by a discussion of the gaps folks are seeing in practice, and ways we might tackle them.

Static Partitioning with Xen, LinuxRT, and Zephyr: A Concrete End-to-end Example – Stefano Stabellini, AMD

Static partitioning enables multiple domains to run alongside each other with no interference. They could be running Linux, an RTOS, or another OS, and all of them have direct access to different portions of the SoC. In the last five years, the Xen community introduced several new features to make Xen-based static partitioning possible. Dom0less to start multiple static domains in parallel at boot, and Cache Coloring to minimize cache interference effects are among them. Static inter-domain communications mechanisms were introduced this year, while “ImageBuilder” has been making system-wide configurations easier. An easy-to-use complete solution is within our grasp. This talk will show the progress made on Xen static partitioning. The audience will learn to configure a realistic reference design with multiple partitions: a LinuxRT partition, a Zephyr partition, and a larger Linux partition. The presentation will show how to set up communication channels and direct hardware access for the domains. It will explain how to measure interrupt latency and use cache coloring to zero cache interference effects. The talk will include a live demo of the reference design.

RTLA: Real-time Linux Analysis Toolset – Daniel Bristot De Oliveira, Red Hat

Currently, Real-time Linux is evaluated using a black-box approach. While the black-box method provides an overview of the system, it fails to provide a root cause analysis for unexpected values. Developers have to use kernel trace features to debug these cases, requiring extensive knowledge about the system and fastidious tracing setup and breakdown. Such analysis will be even more impactful after the PREEMPT_RT merge. To support these cases, since version 5.17, the Linux kernel includes a new tool named rtla, which stands for Real-time Linux Analysis. The rtla is a meta-tool that consists of a set of commands that aims to analyze the real-time properties of Linux. Instead of testing Linux as a black box, rtla leverages kernel tracing capabilities to provide precise information about latencies and root causes of unexpected results. In this talk, Daniel will present two tools provided by rtla. The timerlat tool to measure IRQ and thread latency for interrupt-driven applications and the osnoise tool to evaluate the ability of Linux to isolate workload from the interferences from the rest of the system. The presentation includes examples of how to use the tool to find the root cause analysis and collect extra tracing information directly from the tool.

Boeing joins the ELISA Project as a Premier Member to Strengthen its Commitment to Safety-Critical Applications

By Announcement, News, Working Group, Workshop

Boeing to lead New Aerospace Working Group

SAN FRANCISCO – August 11, 2022 –  Today, the ELISA (Enabling Linux in Safety Applications) Project announced that Boeing has joined as a Premier member, marking its commitment to Linux and its effective use in safety critical applications. Hosted by the Linux Foundation, ELISA is an open source initiative that aims to create a shared set of tools and processes to help companies build and certify Linux-based safety-critical applications and systems.

“Boeing is modernizing software to accelerate innovation and provide greater value to our customers,” said Jinnah Hosein, Vice President of Software Engineering at the Boeing Company. “The demand for safe and secure software requires rapid iteration, integration, and validation. Standardizing around open source products enhanced for safety-critical avionics applications is a key aspect of our adoption of state-of-the-art techniques and processes.”

As a leading global aerospace company, Boeing develops, manufactures and services commercial airplanes, defense products, and space systems for customers in more than 150 countries. It’s already using Linux in current avionics systems, including commercial systems certified to DO-178C Design Assurance Level D. Joining the ELISA Project will help pursue the vision for generational change in software development at Boeing. Additionally, Boeing will work with the ELISA Technical Steering Committee (TSC) to launch a new Aerospace Working Group that will work in parallel with the other working groups like automotive, medical devices, and others.

“We want to improve industry-standard tools related to certification and assurance artifacts in order to standardize improvements and contribute new features back to the open source community. We hope to leverage open source tooling (such as a cloud-based DevSecOps software factory) and industry standards to build world class software and provide an environment that attracts industry leaders to drive cultural change at Boeing,” said Hosein.

Linux is used in all major industries because it can enable faster time to market for new features and take advantage of the quality of the code development processes. Launched in February 2019, ELISA works with Linux kernel and safety communities to agree on what should be considered when Linux is used in safety-critical systems. The project has several dedicated working groups that focus on providing resources for system integrators to apply and use to analyze qualitatively and quantitatively on their systems.

“Linux has a history of being a reliable and stable development platform that advances innovation for a wide range of industries,” said Kate Stewart, Vice President of Dependable Embedded Systems at the Linux Foundation. “With Boeing’s membership, ELISA will start a new focus in the aerospace industry, which is already using Linux in selected applications. We look forward to working with Boeing and others in the aerospace sector, to build up best practices for working with Linux in this space.”

Other ELISA Project members include ADIT, AISIN AW CO., Arm, Automotive Grade Linux, Automotive Intelligence and Control of China, Banma, BMW Car IT GmbH, Codethink, Elektrobit, Horizon Robotics, Huawei Technologies, Intel, Lotus Cars, Toyota, Kuka, Linuxtronix. Mentor, NVIDIA, SUSE, Suzuki, Wind River, OTH Regensburg, Toyota and ZTE.

Upcoming ELISA Events

The ELISA Project has several upcoming events for the community to learn more or to get involved including:

  • ELISA Summit – Hosted virtually for participants around the world on September 7-8, this event will feature overview of the project, the mission and goals for each working group and an opportunity for attendees to ask questions and network with ELISA leaders. The schedule is now live and includes speakers from Aptiv Services Deutschland GmbH, Boeing, CodeThink, The Linux Foundation, Mobileye, Red Hat and Robert Bosch GmbH. Check out the schedule here: https://events.linuxfoundation.org/elisa-summit/program/schedule/. Registration is free and open to the public. https://elisa.tech/event/elisa-summit-virtual/
  • ELISA Forum – Hosted in-person in Dublin, Ireland, on September 12, this event takes place the day before Open Source Summit Europe begins. It will feature an update on all of the working groups, an interactive System-Theoretic Process Analysis (STPA) use case and an Ask Me Anything session.  Pre-registration is required. To register for ELISA Forum, add it to your Open Source Summit Europe registration.
  • Open Source Summit Europe – Hosted in-person in Dublin and virtually on September 13-16, ELISA will have two dedicated presentations about enabling safety in safety-critical applications and safety and open source software. Learn more.

For more information about ELISA, visit https://elisa.tech/.

About the Linux Foundation

Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation and its projects are supported by more than 2,950 members. The Linux Foundation is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, hardware, standards, and data. Linux Foundation projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, ONAP, Hyperledger, RISC-V, and more. The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users, and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit us at linuxfoundation.org.

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see its trademark usage page: www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

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Join us at ELISA Project September Events

By Blog, Industry Conference, News, Working Group, Workshop

Launched in February 2019, the ELISA (Enabling Linux in Safety Applications) Project works with Linux kernel and safety communities to agree on what should be considered when Linux is used in safety-critical systems. The project has several dedicated working groups that focus on providing resources for system integrators to apply and use to analyze qualitatively and quantitatively on their systems.

If you’re new to the project and would like to learn more about the community, ELISA has several upcoming events in September that you can attend to meet ambassadors or project members, receive updates about technical milestones and goals of each of the working groups and ask questions or get involved. Focused Working Groups include Automotive, Linux Features for Safety-Critical Systems, Medical Devices, Open Source Engineer Processes, Safety Architecture, Systems and Tool Investigation and Code Improvement and they are always looking for more participants.

September events:

  • ELISA Summit – Hosted virtually for participants around the world on September 7-8, this event will feature overview of the project, the mission and goals for each working group and an opportunity for attendees to ask questions and network with ELISA leaders. View the schedule here. Registration is free and open to the public. https://elisa.tech/event/elisa-summit-virtual/
  • ELISA Forum – Hosted in-person in Dublin, Ireland, on September 12, this event takes place the day before Open Source Summit Europe begins. It will feature an update on all of the working groups, an interactive System-Theoretic Process Analysis (STPA) use case and an Ask Me Anything session.  Pre-registration is required. To register for ELISA Forum, add it to your Open Source Summit Europe registration.
  • Open Source Summit Europe – Hosted in-person in Dublin, Ireland, and virtually on September 13-16, ELISA will have two dedicated presentations about enabling safety in safety-critical applications and safety and open source software. Learn more.
  • ELISA Workshop – Hosted in-person in Manchester, England, at Codethink offices. This workshop offers an opportunity for active ELISA contributors and members to have interactive discussions on predetermined topics and have side-by-side working sessions. Learn more.

Introduction to ELISA (Video)

By Blog, Working Group, Workshop

The Spring ELISA Workshop, which took place on April 5-7 virtually, had more than 130 global registrants that learned more about the various working groups, hot topics related to enabling linux in safety applications and networked with ambassadors. If you missed the workshop, you can check out the materials here or subscribe to the ELISA Youtube Channel and add these sessions to your watch list.

At the workshop, Shuah Khan, Chair of the ELISA Technical Steering Committee (TSC) and Kernel Maintainer and Linux Fellow at the Linux Foundation, joined Kate Stewart, ELISA TSC member and co-chair of the Medical Devices Working Group, to kick off the workshop with an introduction to the ELISA Project.

You can view the video below, which is intended for new community members interested in the project and those who aren’t regular participants in the working groups.

We invite you to join a working group to learn more! Click here to check out the working groups and subscribe to their mailing lists and calendars to join meetings.