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What is a page table and why should we care about it?(Video)

By Blog, Seminar Series

In March, the ELISA Project launched the Monthly Seminar Series, which focuses on hot topics related to ELISA and its mission. Presenters are members, contributors and thought leaders from the ELISA Project and surrounding communities.

For June, Khalid Aziz, Senior Software Engineer from Oracle, gave a presentation titled, “What is a page table and why should we care about it?” Physical memory on a computer is a shared resource. Kernel allocates and reclaims this shared resource to ensure all workloads on a system have adequate resources to complete their tasks. Accurate management of physical memory assignment is required for fairness and data safety. This is the task of Memory Management subsystem in the Linux kernel. We will discuss how the Memory Management subsystem assigns and tracks physical memory, how it ensures isolation between unrelated workloads and how it enables sharing of data in memory for workloads that need it. We will discuss the management overhead associated with isolation and dive deeper into  specific approaches on managing overhead for effective sharing.

The March seminar focused on the Real-time Linux Analysis Toolset. ELISA community member Daniel Bristot De Oliveira, Senior Principal Software Engineering at Red Hat, presented the tools provided by rtla. You can find out more or watch the video here.

Real-time Linux Analysis Toolset (Video)

By Blog, Seminar Series

On Wednesday, March 16, the ELISA Project  officially launched its Monthly Seminar Series, which focuses on hot topics related to ELISA and its mission. Presenters are members, contributors and thought leaders from the ELISA Project and surrounding communities.

The March seminar focused on the Real-time Linux Analysis Toolset. ELISA community member Daniel Bristot De Oliveira, Senior Principal Software Engineering at Red Hat, present the tools provided by rtla.

From 5.17, Linux includes a new tool named rtla, which stands for Real-time Linux Analysis. The rtla is a meta-tool that consists of a set of commands that aims to analyze the real-time properties of Linux. But instead of testing Linux as a black box, rtla leverages kernel tracing capabilities to provide precise
information about the properties and root causes of unexpected results.

In this video, Daniel presents two tools provided by rtla. The timerlat tool used to measure IRQ and thread latency for interrupt-driven applications (important for the PREEMPT_RT kernel), and the osnoise tool used to evaluate the ability of Linux to isolate, from the scheduling perspective, a workload from
the interferences from the rest of the system. The presentation also includes examples of using the tool to find the root cause of unexpected latencies and how to collect extra tracing information directly from the tool.

Stay tuned for more details about the next seminar. Until then, check out the schedule and register for the ELISA Spring Workshop, hosted online on April 5-7. Register here for free: https://events.linuxfoundation.org/elisa-workshop-spring/.